Linguicism to ‘native-speakerism’: reflections on my M.ED TESOL dissertation findings

Background I first came across Robert Philipson’s book Linguistic Imperialism during term one of my M.Ed TESOL course at the University of the West of Scotland when I undertook a course titled, English as a Global Language. Being an L1 speaker of English, I have always been aware of the seemingly omnipresent nature of EnglishContinue reading “Linguicism to ‘native-speakerism’: reflections on my M.ED TESOL dissertation findings”

Close Encounters with the Consequences of ‘Native-speakerism’: Reflections and Actions-on.

‘Native-speakerism’ is something that ELT is trying desperately to move away from, although efforts are, in my opinion, still not enough. It still seems that we as a global ELT community hold a widely-espoused belief: ‘native speakerism’ is wrong! – yet, the industry, or should I say, certain members, continue to promulgate the idea ofContinue reading “Close Encounters with the Consequences of ‘Native-speakerism’: Reflections and Actions-on.”